System of inequalities word problems
System of inequalities word problems

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SAT (Fall 2023)

  • Solving linear equations and linear inequalities — Basic example
  • Solving linear equations and linear inequalities — Harder example
  • Interpreting linear functions — Basic example
  • Interpreting linear functions — Harder example
  • Linear equation word problems — Basic example
  • Linear equation word problems — Harder example
  • Linear inequality word problems — Basic example
  • Linear inequality word problems — Harder example
  • Graphing linear equations — Basic example
  • Graphing linear equations — Harder example
  • Linear function word problems — Basic example
  • Linear function word problems — Harder example
  • Systems of linear inequalities word problems — Basic example
  • Systems of linear inequalities word problems — Harder example
  • Solving systems of linear equations — Basic example
  • Solving systems of linear equations — Harder example
  • Systems of linear equations word problems — Basic example
  • Systems of linear equations word problems — Harder example

Systems of linear inequalities word problems — Harder example

Watch Sal work through a harder Systems of linear inequalities word problem.

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  • So ‘ at least’ means ‘no less than’ and ‘ equal to or more than’?(72 votes)
    • Yes. At least does mean ‘greater than or equal to’ or ‘no less than’. x is at least 10, is x ≥ 10(3 votes)
  • is there an easy way or one or two clues to mastering this topic? My SAT is next week and I really want to master this but it is kind of hard. Especially ones involving graphs.(19 votes)
  • what is the best way to approach and tackle word problems,am poor at it.(9 votes)
    • I’d do what Sal does: go and underline the important parts of the word problem. After you find the key parts of the problem, use that simpler information to solve. Hope this helps. :)(33 votes)
  • If it said “up to 24” how come you use the greater than/equal to sign? Wouldn’t 24 be the maximum? Thanks(8 votes)
    • actually, you would use the less than/equal to sign. you might have gotten confused with one of the incorrect answers on the bottom. hope this helped :)(3 votes)
  • at1:09
    I did not understand why c>or equal to a(4 votes)
    • Because in the question he said that the one box must have ( at least as many cell phones “c” as accessories “a” ) ..
      And ( At least ” > ” as many ” = ” ) means > or equal(6 votes)
  • I want to give the digital SAT in october and im an indian student. how do I register for it?(3 votes)
    • college board website(1 vote)
  • At, are you sure that at least 6 means greater than or equal to 6 or less than or equal to 6? Because when I watched it after I worked on the question, I was sure to pick D but was also influenced to pick A. 3:11(1 vote)
    • At least 6 means that the lowest possible number that our value could be is 6. In other words, the value must be 6 and up, or greater than or equal to 6. It’s tough to keep all of the trigger words for inequalities straight sometimes, but “at least” means greater than or equal to and “at most” is less than or equal to.(4 votes)
  • Each box must have atleast as many cell phones as accessories. Can anyone please explain what this line means?(2 votes)
    • Each box (which is allowed to have 24 units total) must have at least as many cell phones as accessories. This means that there cannot be more accessories than cell phones. The cell phones have to either be the same amount as the accessories or more. This is why C is greater than or equal to A.(2 votes)

Video transcript

– [Instructor] We’re told, “Luis is cooking meals for at least 20 people. He estimates that the cost of each vegetarian meal is $3, and the cost of each meal with meat is $4.50. His budget for the meals is no more than $100, and he wants to cook at least six of each type of meal. Which of the following systems of inequalities represents the conditions described if x is the number of vegetarian meals and y is the number of meals with meat Luis cooks?” So pause this video and have a go at this yourself before we work through it together. And I know this is a long question and these systems feel complicated, but trust me, if you do it step-by-step you’ll actually find that it all falls into place. All right, now let’s work through it together, and it’s important to emphasize that they’ve already defined the two key variables for us. x is the number of vegetarian meals and y is the number of meals with meat. So let’s look at each of the constraints they give us and each of these can set up a different inequality. So the first one is, they say, “Luis is cooking meals for at least 20 people.” So that tells us that the total number of meals, which is going to be the number of vegetarian meals, that’s x, plus the number of meat meals, that has to be at least equal to 20. So that has to be greater than or equal to 20. That’s what that first sentence tells us. And if I wasn’t doing this as a multiple choice, I would just keep adding more and more constraints here, but they give us some choices. And so we can see that x plus y is greater than or equal to 20, that’s in choice A. It’s actually not in choice B. So we can already rule out choice B. They have less than or equal to 20 here. Same thing for choice C. So we can rule that out. And then choice D does have that. So we are still in the running. The next constraint they tell us, “He estimates that the cost of each vegetarian meal is $3, and the cost of each meal with meat is 4.50. His budget for the meals is no more than $100.” So how much is he gonna spend in total? Well, on the vegetarian meals, he’s going to spend the number of vegetarian meals times $3 per meal. So that’s how much he’s going to spend on vegetarian meals. And what about meat meals? Well, it’s going to be y meals times 4.50 per meal. So it’s 4.5 times y. The amount that he’s spending on vegetarian meals, the amount that he’s spending on non-vegetarian meals, that’s the total he’s spending on meals. And they say it is no more than $100. So this has to be less than or equal to 100. And so let’s see, we actually over here, we have 3x plus 4.5y is greater than or equal to 100. So we can rule choice A out as well and just by deductive reasoning, we see choice D does have that in there. But this must be the answer, but let’s keep going to make sure that these other constraints work. We are also told he wants to cook at least six type of each meal. So that means that x, the number of vegetarian meals, has to be greater than or equal to six. And y, the number of non-vegetarian meals, also has to be greater than or equal to six. And we see both of these down here, so we can feel pretty good about choice D.

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