Social Media in the Workplace | COBIDU eLearning
Social Media in the Workplace | COBIDU eLearning

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In this invited paper the author summarises the benefits which can be gained from use of social media to support research activities. The paper is based on personal experiences in using social media to engage with fellow researchers, meet new collaborators and co-authors and enhance awareness and impact of research papers.

OR2012: the 7th International Conference on …

Can LinkedIn and Academia. edu Enhance Access to Open Repositories?

2012 •

First Monday

Scholars’ temporal participation on, temporary disengagement from, and return to Twitter

Even though the extant literature investigates how and why academics use social media, much less is known about academics’ temporal patterns of social media use. This mixed methods study provides a first-of-its-kind investigation into temporal social media use. In particular, we study how academics’ use of Twitter varies over time and examine the reasons why academics temporarily disengage and return to the social media platform. We employ data mining methods to identify a sample of academics on Twitter (n = 3,996) and retrieve the tweets they posted (n = 9,025,127). We analyze quantitative data using descriptive and inferential statistics, and qualitative data using the constant comparative approach. Results show that Twitter use is predominantly connected to traditional work hours and is well-integrated into academics’ professional endeavors, suggesting that professional use of Twitter has become “ordinary.” Though scholars rarely announce their departure from or return to Twitter…

2015 •

This study explores scholarly use of social media by PhD students through a mix-method approach of qualitative interviews and a case study of #phdchat conversation. Social media tools, such as blogs, Twitter and Facebook, can be used by PhD students and early career researchers to promote their professional profiles, disseminate their work to a wider audience quickly, and gain feedback and support from peers across the globe. There are also difficulties and potential problems such as the lack of standards and incentives, the risks of ideas being stolen, lack of knowledge of how to start and maintain using social media tool and the potential need to invest significant amount of time and effort. We found that respondents employed various strategies to maximize the impact of their scholarly communication practice.

The benefits of Web 2.0 in a museum context are now being increasingly accepted, with papers at recent Museums and the Web conferences having highlighted a range of ways in which services such as Flickr and YouTube and technologies such as blogs and wikis can be used. But what of the associated risks? What of the various concerns that the sector is beginning to address: concerns that the services may not be sustainable; institutional data may be locked into external services; services may infringe accessibility guidelines and associated legislation; users may lose interest in the services; inappropriate user-generated content may be published on the service; data created or stored on the services may not be preserved; etc.? In a paper on “Web 2.0: How to Stop Thinking and Start Doing: Addressing Organisational Barriers” presented at Museums and the Web 2007 conference, the authors encouraged museums to take a leap of faith and begin experimentation with use of Web 2.0. But now that organisations have a clearer idea of the benefits which Web 2.0 can provide, it is appropriate to “stop doing and start thinking”. This paper describes a framework for supporting cultural heritage organisations in their use of Web 2.0 services, with examples of how this framework can be used in various contexts are provided.

Journal of the American College of Radiology

Comparison of European (ESR) and American (ACR) White Papers on Teleradiology: Patient Primacy Is Paramount

Main messages: • Online social networking enhances communication and collaboration between peers • Social media facilitate access to educational and scientific information • Recommendations and guidelines from policymakers and professional organisations are needed • Applications are desired for efficient and secure exchange of medical images in social media.

2012 •

This study explores scholarly use of social media by PhD researchers through mix-methods of qualitative interviews, participant observation and content analysis of a case study #phdchat. We found that blogs, Twitter and Facebook are among the most popular social media tools being used by researchers. They can be used by PhD students and early career researchers to benefit their scholarly communication practice, promote their professional profiles, disseminate their work to a wider audience quickly, and gain feedbacks and support from peers across the globe. There are also difficulties and potential problems such as the lack of standards and incentives, the risks of idea being pinched and plagiarism, lack of knowledge of how to start and maintain using social media tool and the potential huge amount of time and effort needed to invest. We found that respondents link different social media tools together to maximise the impact of the content disseminated, as well as to create a person…

There is an abundance of free online tools accessible to scientists and others that can be used for online networking, data sharing and measuring research impact. Despite this, few scientists know how these tools can be used or fail to take advantage of using them as an integrated pipeline to raise awareness of their research outputs. In this article, the authors describe their experiences with these tools and how they can make best use of them to make their scientific research generally more accessible, extending its reach beyond their own direct networks, and communicating their ideas to new audiences. These efforts have the potential to drive science by sparking new collaborations and interdisciplinary research projects that may lead to future publications, funding and commercial opportunities. The intent of this article is to: describe some of these freely accessible networking tools and affiliated products; demonstrate from our own experiences how they can be utilized effectively; and, inspire their adoption by new users for the benefit of science.

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Intentional Web Presence: 10 SEO Strategies Every Academic Needs to Know

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Academia.edu: Social network or Academic Network?

2013 •

TechTrends

Creating an intentional web presence: Strategies for every educational technology professional

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Onomastica Uralica

Resources, media, networks and future of onomastic studies

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